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Unit 5
Places
5.1 Accomodation
Types of location

a vibrant place — lively;

a dull place — boring;

a bustling place
 — very crowded;

a contemporary place — modern, up to date.

Types of accomodation

Detached house
 — not connected to any other building;

semi detached house — joined to another similar house on only one side;

cottage — a small house, usually in the countryside;

bedsit — a rented room which has a bed, table, chairs and somewhere to cook in it;

time share — a holiday house or apartment which is owned by several different people, each of whom is able to use it for a particular period of the year.
Rooms and Places in the Home

Utility room — usually just for washing machine, freezer etc.;

shed — a separated building from the house usually for storing garden tools;

attic — room in the roof space of a house (could be lived in.);

cellar — room below ground level without any windows used for storage;

hall — open area as you come into the house;

porch — covered area before the entrance door;

terrace or patio — paved area between the house and garden for sitting and eating, etc.;

sudy — a room for reading, writing, studying in;

balcony — an area with a wall or bars around it that is joined to the outside wall of a building on an upper level;

landlady (landlord) — the owner of the flat which you rent;

tenant, lodger, roomer — the person who rents;

lease — a rent agreement;

Phrasal verbs:

Look for — to try to find;

move in — to get into the flat;

move out — to get out of the flat;

settle down
 — to start living somewhere permanently;

put down (money)
— to give the payment.

Idioms:

Home is where the heart is
 — a home is not a physical place, but where the people you love are;

to eat someone out of house and home — to eat a lot of food (usually when you are a guest at someone's home);

to get on like a house on fire — to get on very well with someone;

to keep house — to carry out the tasks necessary for running a household (cooking, cleaning etc.);

skeleton in the closet:— an embarrassing or shameful secret;

hit the roof — become very angry;

smoke like a chimney — smoke a lot;

make yourself at home — make yourself comfortable;

be home and dry have successfully completed something, as a project or activity.

1
Lets test your vocabulary.
Fill in the gaps with appropriate words/word combinations.
Start test
I've got much unnecessary stuff in which I keep in the large ______________under my house
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The members of my extended family have holidays in different parts of the year, so we decided to buy a _______________ in the Carpathians and take turns living in it.
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Most people have at least one skeleton in the_________.
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I've been renting a flat for 2 years and my ___________ is a really nice woman.
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In case you need a residence permit ,you'd better rent officially and sign a ______________.
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When I found out Tom crashed my car, I hit the__________.
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When I met Mary first time, we got on like a house____________.
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There are always many people and much music playing around, the place is so_____________.
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The walls in our________ house were so thin that we could hear neighbors talking and lauging.
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Look through the words again, please.
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Not bad!
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Nice:)
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Good)))
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Cool:)
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2
Watch the video.
3
Creative writing: use your active vocabulary when answering the questions (3-4 sentences), please.
1. Making eco-friendly houses is a trend now. What other materials do you think would make a good choice? Why?

2. If you had to move house because of your job now, what ideal accommodation/location would you choose?

3. Have you ever rented a flat? Give an idea of your "flatmate from heaven" and "flatmate from hell".



Have you completed the lesson?
5.2 Culture shock
Emigration — Leaving one country to move to another (e.g., the Pilgrims emigrated from England);

immigration — Moving into a new country (e.g., the Pilgrims immigrated to America);

culture shock — the difficulty people have adjusting to a new culture that differs markedly from their own;

adaptation — changing one’s behavior so as to fit in better with local customs;

custom — a practice from the past that people continue to observe;

diversity — wide variations on features;

ethnic goup — a group of people who share a language, history, or place of origin; a large group of people who have more in common with each other than they do with other peoples;

ethnocentrism — regarding one’s own culture as being superior to others and judging other cultures from the perspective of your own culture;

subculture — the attitudes, beliefs, values, and behavioral habits shared by a group of people within a society, which differ from those of the society as a whole;
brain drain - the phenomenon in which developing countries send their best students abroad for a higher Education and those students choose to stay abroad rather than return home;

diaspora — a group whose members live scattered outside of their traditional homeland;

political asylum — when a country allows a foreign citizen to reside there as a way to avoid persecution or arrest in their home country;

refugee — a person who seeks shelter from war, disaster, or persecution by leaving their home;

welfare — assistance provided by the government to the poor to help them with living expenses;

repatriation — the act of returning to one’s country of origin;

skilled labor — work that requires some form of specialized training: plumbing, electricial wiring, and manufacturing are examples of skilled labor;

unskilled labor — work that requires little or no specialized training;

cultural stereotypes — a fixed idea that people have about what someone or something is like, especially an idea that is wrong.
Phrasal verbs:
To cope with — deal with something;

to settle down — to have a more steady and stable life;

to adapt (to) — to change habits and behaviors to suit new environment.
Idioms:
Global village — the entire world and its inhabitants Grass is always greener on the other side of the fence-you think the other people have something better then you do;

home (away) from home — somewhere you are as comfortable as you are in your own home;

to feel homesick — to miss home;

to make yourself at home — to make yourself comfortable.
1
Lets test your vocabulary.
Fill in the gaps with appropriate words/word combinations.
Start test
Many young people who have a good university education flee the country and go to Europe to seek better life. That is called_________
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When war broke out people turned into ______________ leaving homes with their children and their possessions.
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When we emigrated to Canada for some time we lived only on ___________ the country paid.
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Every time I have a long business trip I feel ______________________-.
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Amy's flat is the place where I always feel ___________
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I feel very homesick now, but hopefully, I'll cope_____ it.
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It's high time for you to settle______ and start a family life.
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Very often people who go abroad think that___________-is greener on the other side of the fence.
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My ancestors immigrated to Germany seeking a(an) ___________ because of political persecution.
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During the period of adaptation the members of Ukranian ________ supported me a lot.
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Look through the words again, please.
Restart
Not bad!
Restart
Nice:)
Restart
Good)))
Restart
Cool:)
Restart
2
Watch the video.
3
Creative writing: use your active vocabulary when answering the questions (3-4 sentences), please.
  1. Have You ever experienced troubles because of the cultural differences? What was the country and the situation that you faced?
  2. Give an example of a gesture (any body language sign that could be interpreted differently in different parts of the world.
  3. Provide an example of your native idiom/saying/proverb that could be unclear for a foreigner and make a confusion.
Have you completed the lesson?
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